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nemonymous


ZENCORE | CERN ZOO | CONE ZERO

Knowing about these books is not enough.


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Perigenesis
nemonymous
EXTRACT FROM MY REVIEW OF YEAR'S BEST WEIRD FICTION VOLUME ONE HERE

nullimmortalis
I took this photo earlier today before reading the Blumlein.

I took this photo earlier today before reading the Blumlein.

Success by Michael Blumlein
“Take a leak, catch a glimpse of myself in the bathroom mirror.”
I have spoken for many years about parthenogenesis in literature, and late-labelling and nemonymity, but I see now I should have been talking about perigenesis. From epigene to perigene. This man — in synergy with his wife, she with him, then variously out of such synergy, till a new particle into his Large Hard-On Collider comes into play at the novella’s end — represents the apotheosis of the Jeffrey Thomas syndrome in the help (or love and care) coming unexpectedly from what he sees in the mirror, or does he become divided against self in this story, an equivalent Internet flamer or troll perhaps now become altruist and prophet? My own real-time reviewing of fiction books as a seeking out of the literary perigene as a preternatural gestalt, now called dreamcatching — if I may be my own version of this novella’s flaming dichotomy of a protagonist and slightly pretentious to boot — is equivalent to what he builds in the garden, never higher than the fence till it is indeed higher than the fence. Like the Langan story in this book, this novella is of genuine driving power, with no glance to either side, except to both sides of the Proustian self, and to its ultimate goal within a portrait of marital relations. I have been married to the same woman for, so far, 45 years. This story simply is. Arising from manic Socratic dialogue and Lamarckian ambition, whither it takes you, I know not exactly where. It is not a Classic of Weird Fiction, not Weird Fiction at all, so why featured in this book, other than to co-create the book’s gestalt? It is a Classic of the Unweird for me, and if it were not for my overweening interest in ‘Weird Fiction’ and thus in this book, I would never have had the privilege to read it.